Speakers sought: editorial webinars, Infosecurity Magazine

This month and next, I’m moderating two editorial webinars for Infosecurity Magazine.

Full details are below. The usual preference for non-vendor speakers applies.

If you are interested and available to take part at the times shown, please contact me via one of the options here.

Sony Pictures Entertainment: The Fallout from 2014’s Biggest Breach
(Jan 29th, 3pm GMT)
From November through to the new year, the headlines were awash with the major cyber-attack on Sony Pictures Entertainment. Details continue to filter through about the scale of the breach. We already know about the vast quantities of personal data leaked (including social security numbers); the theft and dissemination of intellectual property, such as film scripts and actual motion pictures; and, of course, the initial cancellation of the North Korea-lampooning flick, The Interview.
Dig a little further, though, and how much do we really know about how the attack was perpetrated? Who is to blame? The FBI was quick to point the finger at North Korea, and the US government has even imposed sanctions on the nation in response. Security experts have lined up to dispute the FBI’s claims, but attempts to identify a plausible alternative haven’t generated much traction.
This webinar looks at the incident’s implications from a security point of view. The panelists will examine where Sony went wrong, how far the blame can be extended to the entertainment giant, the plausibility of the FBI’s claim, and what the wider significance of this political hot potato could be.

Encryption Under Attack: Government vs Privacy
(Feb 5th, 3pm GMT)
Animosity towards encryption is growing from certain sectors of government, as recent controversial public statements make clear. But encryption, security advocates insist, is vital in securing virtual assets and ensuring privacy. Furthermore, the business implications of a restriction on secure methods of communication (as the likes of UK PM David Cameron advocate) would no doubt be negative. New encryption technologies are constantly being developed – and this aspect of the security market is buoyant and highly relevant.
Attacks on encryption stands contrary to the approach that the tech industry has advocated in the post-Snowden world. Indeed, not only do many tech and security commentators decry governments’ attacks on encryption, they also question the practicability of banning technologies that facilitate encrypted comms.
This webinar examines these core issues. The panelists will discuss the encryption technologies that deliver enhanced security across a range of channels; the potential implications of government hostility towards secure, private communication and storage; and why encryption has once again become a politically controversial issue.

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About stephenpritchard
Freelance journalist specialising in business and technology, based in London (UK).

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